Wpisy oznaczone tagiem "watchdog of counterfeit" (3)  

rebeccasaunders
 
Proliferation of counterfeit medicine market is a great concern to government regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical companies, health care providers and consumers. However, its percentage is continuously increasing not only in poor and developing countries but also in developed ones. Unfortunately, counterfeiting is one of the most underrated issues in the world that contributes largely to morbidity, mortality and drug intoxication of people of ages, religions and cultures.

One of the reasons why there is the domination of counterfeit medicines is the lack of attention given by the rightful authorities. Even with the strict policies, many national governments are focused on the smuggling of illegal drugs such as opium and heroin in their countries that the seemingly “legit” pharmaceutical drugs pass their investigation. Cities know for strict implementation of policies against smuggled drugs includes Jakarta, Indonesia, Singapore, Victoria, Hong Kong and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, yet these countries are also among the countries which have the highest number of counterfeit cases.

Only a few and only those dedicated in this special case give concern for the worsening number of counterfeit medicines victims in the world - included in this are the non-profit organizations with the ultimate advocacy to obliterate the number of fraudulent cases.  In their effort to eliminate drug counterfeiting from the main problems of the world, studies and reviews are being created because of this.

The Peterson Group, one of these concerned NGOs has developed falsified medicine analysis for years and has reported special cases vital in determining the total scale of the problem. Their falsified medicine analysis expertise is ideally positioned to address the highly technical issues involved in investigating the increasingly sophisticated falsified medicines or counterfeit medicines being discovered in legitimate supply chains. As a key tool in our pharmaceutical supply chain surveillance for counterfeit medicines services, our laboratory network employ a wide scope of investigative analytical technology such as mass spectrometry (MS), infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, RAMAN spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and more, to explore and assist in the identification of fake medicines.

With the assistance of advanced research labs funded by concerned pharmaceutical companies and individuals, these systems are already underway in determining the impact of counterfeit medicines in a region by region scale. Some of these methods may take a lot of time to produce results but with proper effort and support, falsified medicine analysis, which seems too complicated in the early times, can be more comprehensive.

For more info:
thepetersongroupmed.socialparadox.com/(…)falsified-…
 

roince
 

Africa always seems to be the target of counterfeiting. Is it because of the lack of awareness among African people? Or perhaps the stereotype tagged in the general outlook of the continent as being poor and illiterate?

Whatever the impression is on Africa’s lifestyle and education, the issue of drug counterfeiting continues to escalate.

When it was once an anti-malarial medicine in Kenya that exposed African conflict against fraudulent counterfeiting which remains unsolvable until today, another part of Africa emerges in mainstream news as the production, exportation, importation and distribution of fake drugs worsen. It is even more agitated by the fact that higher powers are behind the illegal and criminal act.

The widespread of anti-malarial drug scams were reviewed to be led by drug cartels and large mafia of ex-convicts and people with criminal records. This time, the government, the same voice of the people who are supposed to be the ones leading the battle against counterfeiting are the ones who tolerates and even gets involved in the illegal trade.

In an interview conducted by the Peterson Group, one of the first non-profit organizations to inform the public of the latest news on campaigns against counterfeiting, with Liberia Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (LMHRA), the government sector has disclosed that the Government of Liberia sometimes imports into the country fake medicines to be distributed among public hospitals.

“The proliferation of these medicines is posing serious threats to the health of Liberians”, LMHRA Managing Director, Pharmacist David Sumo warned.

Almost all Liberians trust the Public Health Sector when it comes to medicine as they are the only ones who can provide trusted and high-quality medicines to the people.

Sumo added, “Once this news spreads, pandemonium is expected to occur among the public”.

The medicines were confiscated after it was found out that they all have the same series and batch numbers but different manufacturing dates. LMHRA was given the amount of US$60,000 to monitor medicines in five counties including Montserrado, Bomi, and Margibi, among others.

LMHRA is now implementing strict regulations on the import of medicines within Liberia and they are also starting to inform the public of this current threat. The government, on the other hand denies the accusations as they reason that they do not have the resources to procure the medicines.

The drugs were traced back to be manufactured in Jakarta, Indonesia.

read more:
www.newswire.com/(…)the-peterson-group-counterfeit-…
www.yelp.com/(…)the-peterson-group-counterfeit-drug…
foursquare.com/petersongrpmed
  • awatar Vasil Novik: The issue of drugs importation is not only done by owners of private pharmacies, but institutions of government responsible for health-related matters that are in the habit of purchasing fake drugs through the procurement process introduced by the government.
  • awatar Ana Maspoch: I do think that the countries which have reports of counterfeiting have connections to the government. It may not be corruption but abuse of power.
  • awatar Betsy Turner: They should already impeach those politicians who are involved. No more trials needed.
Pokaż wszystkie (5) ›
 

shawnmpowers
 
San Francisco health officials are warning residents of the dangerous counterfeited pills circulating in the state.

Earlier this month, between Oct 13 -17, 2015, 3 adults under 40 years old were hospitalized after ingesting a pill inscribed and sold as “Xanax”, an anti-anxiety pill mostly prescribed for depressed adults. These XANAX were sold in the streets but the labels that were found in the victims’ possession, show it has been manufactured in Jakarta, Indonesia.

According to reviews released by The Peterson Group, one of the leading sources of information about fraud, counterfeited and substandard medicines, Fentanyl, which is found in the pill, may be more difficult than other opiates to reverse with naloxone, possibly requiring extra doses. Opioids are commonly used to relieve severe pain caused by advanced conditions like cancer. Their use, however, is under strict supervision due to its addictive properties and its life threatening side effects, including respiratory depression. Etizolam is a short-acting sedative that produces central nervous system depression. These two agents, when taken together, can result in marked respiratory and central nervous system depression.

Last Thursday, additional records of victims were also reported. This time, five students were intoxicated, ranging from grades 10 – 12. They were immediately sent to the hospital but would be facing disciplinary action once they are to return. Further investigations are being done in Pinole Valley High School. Similar with those found in the San Francisco, the pills all contained fentanyl, a potent, short-acting opioid that lead to overdose and death.

Counterfeit medicines are a life-long enemy not only of the state but of the world but with the advancement of technology, fraudsters have also progressed with their bogus operations. The authorities are currently raising awareness on the prevention of any complications and to stay away from medicines which are sold without prescription.

For people who do purchase prescription drugs on the street, or who are exposed to opioids, the San Francisco Department of Public Health encourages them to have access to naloxone to combat overdose.

Naloxone is a short-acting opioid antagonist that is sprayed intranasal or injected to reverse an overdose. Naloxone is not a controlled substance, can be prescribed by any licensed health care provider, and can be administered by witnesses as a first aid measure. This antagonist is also available for free under the government’s DOPE project, targeting drug users and their friends and families via syringe exchange sites.


read more:
thepetersongroupmed.kinja.com/tag/jakarta
thepetersongroup.org/blogs/
 

 

Kategorie blogów